"You know what the worst job in America is? It’s newspaper reporter. I guess the pollsters forgot to ask the guy who cleans the toilets at Dodger Stadium how things are going for him."

— Jimmy Kimmel, from Jimmy Kimmel Live! April 24, 2013.

It’s been a while since I last posted. It seems fitting that I return to this blog with photos from a film camera I recently purchased.

Before anyone calls me a hipster, let me set the record straight: I’ve always had an affinity for film. After all, it’s what I grew up with.

Millennials are perhaps the last generation in America who will fully experience straddling the big technological chasm between analog and digital. Most of us in Gen-Y still remember the era of the tape – quaint little antiquities such as the VHS, cassette and 35mm film. 

My first camera was a Bialosky that took 110 film. This red and black toy camera came with a picture book, which had a teddy bear that would explain the basics of photography to kids. This was my first foray into photography.

I received an upgrade for Christmas a few years later. My second camera was a consumer-level Nikon that took Advantix film, which was a major development for film photography back in the mid-1990s.

I remember relishing the fact that I could just pop some Advantix film into my Nuvis A20 and begin shooting right away, instead of hassling with rolling out some 135 film and making sure the cogwheels caught the edges of the film. The Advantix format was quickly eclipsed by the rise of digital photography, however, and it flopped like my MiniDisc player.

During my teenage years – when the zenith of digital cameras was a whopping 3 megapixels – I experimented a bit with my dad’s Voigtlander Bessa. I relished the smoothness of the all-metal rangefinder, the solid-sounding click of the shutter and the tension of film being rewound into its roll. 

I realize that digital cameras will always trump film cameras in my profession, where breaking news events demand the quickest of turnarounds and the precision of auto-focus.

Yet even as I enjoy the instant gratification of seeing my photo magically materialize on the LCD screen of my Nikon digital camera, I still yearn for the excitement I felt when the mail carrier would ring the front door of my childhood home with a fresh roll of developed negatives from York.

Reclaiming a piece of that memory was the impetus behind my impulse purchase last week: a 1970s-era Canon AE-1 that I found on Craigslist. I’m happy to say it was worth every penny of the $50 I spent.

These are the fruits of my first roll of film. There will be more, I’m sure. More rolls, more photographs, more experimentation.

And just as I return to film, I plan to return to this blog. I won’t promise much though – just that I haven’t forgotten about this little space I have here on the big, wide Internet.

Photos: Henderson and Downtown Las Vegas | April 2013

Commencement address (2008) by Adrian Tan. #wordstoliveby

University of Chicago, a surprisingly beautiful school where fun goes to die. #northwesternforlyfe #missingchitown

Photos edited with CameraBag 2.

Chicago | March 2012 | © Paul Takahashi

Photos: Joel, the cat | © 2011 Paul Takahashi

So I met tennis star and Las Vegas native Andre Agassi last week. Nevada Gov. Brian Sandoval and former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush were touring his charter school. Agassi looks a bit puzzled at the sight of a reporter crouching below the TV cameras to get this shot. My published photos at the link.
Photo: Andre Agassi | © 2011 Paul Takahashi

So I met tennis star and Las Vegas native Andre Agassi last week. Nevada Gov. Brian Sandoval and former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush were touring his charter school. Agassi looks a bit puzzled at the sight of a reporter crouching below the TV cameras to get this shot. My published photos at the link.

Photo: Andre Agassi | © 2011 Paul Takahashi

minimalmac:

Courage.

RIP Steve Jobs. From Jobs’ 2005 Stanford commencement address:
"No one wants to die.  Even people who want to go to heaven don’t want  to die to get there.  And yet death is the destination we all share.   No one has ever escaped it.  And that is as it should be, because Death  is very likely the single best invention of Life.  It is Life’s change  agent. It clears out the old to make way for the new. Right now the new  is you, but someday not too long from now, you will gradually become the  old and be cleared away.  Sorry to be so dramatic, but it is quite  true.
Your time is limited, so don’t waste it living someone else’s life.   Don’t be trapped by dogma — which is living with the results of other  people’s thinking.  Don’t let the noise of others’ opinions drown out  your own inner voice.  And most important, have the courage to follow  your heart and intuition.  They somehow already know what you truly want  to become.  Everything else is secondary.”

minimalmac:

Courage.

RIP Steve Jobs. From Jobs’ 2005 Stanford commencement address:

"No one wants to die. Even people who want to go to heaven don’t want to die to get there. And yet death is the destination we all share. No one has ever escaped it. And that is as it should be, because Death is very likely the single best invention of Life. It is Life’s change agent. It clears out the old to make way for the new. Right now the new is you, but someday not too long from now, you will gradually become the old and be cleared away. Sorry to be so dramatic, but it is quite true.

Your time is limited, so don’t waste it living someone else’s life. Don’t be trapped by dogma — which is living with the results of other people’s thinking. Don’t let the noise of others’ opinions drown out your own inner voice. And most important, have the courage to follow your heart and intuition. They somehow already know what you truly want to become. Everything else is secondary.”

Photos: Linnea | Bryan, Texas | Sept. 2011

© 2011 Paul Takahashi

Stories: 
‘Ellen DeGeneres Show’ donates $100,000 to Whitney Elementary (1,000+ Facebook “Likes”!)
Principal hits streets in quest to bring students back to class 

viafrank:

Top: Boston.com, free access.
Bottom: BostonGlobe.com’s redesign. Pay-for-access, $4 a week.

I’m having a super tough time choosing here, guys.

(via viafrank-deactivated20120702)